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20121207
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
the senate. are you open to being in a foreign policy team or in the obama cabinet? are you being vetted? >> no, i'm completely unvetted at this time. so, no, that's not my plan. look, i always say that -- i really feel this -- anytime a president calls anybody, and i'm saying it for myself to serve our country, any president, that you've got to give it serious consideration, particularly i've spent my life in public service. but that's not my plan. and i'm not waiting by the telephone. >> i wanted to ask you about the palestinian vote because the u.n. vote today is overwhelmingly in favor of nonmember status at general assembly for the palestinians. they've been told by the u.s. repeatedly this is a step backwards but their argument they've been waiting for 20 years or long somewhere that the negotiations are going nowhere. what is your take on this, because chuck schumer is talking about a defense appropriations amendment which would take money away from the west bank if they proceed. >> yeah, i mean the vote in the united nations, i would say, is not surprising but still disappointing
on corruption? will they reform the economy. what will their foreign policy look like? i have to great guests to shed light on all of that. welcome. and the new yorker china correspondent. liz, you have a very tough blog posting on the excellent council on foreign relations website which you say china's 18th party congress was a heartbreaker. it was a triumph of the party's skrif -- conservative click. the candidate will the strongest credentials were left high and high. they took their place among the top seven. you see this as a real kind of reinstitution of a hard line conservative group. >> i do. i think this was a disappointing outcome from the 18th party congress. if you look at this leadership group they bring a wealth of experience to the table. collectively these seven men have governed roughly half the provinces. or large municipalities. a number of them do have experience at the national level with the economy or political arena but by in large they are distinguished by their lack of distinction. none of them have been associated with an innovative program or policy reform on the e
. -- worry about it every day. those worries, side by side with a host of international and foreign policy and security challenges. we cannot separate the two. when you are talking about our fiscal situation, there is an obvious connection to our national security. i am cognizant of the connection. today we will be speaking only about foreign policy, and in particular in a very focused way on syria. i want to thank those who have made this possible. as the chairman of a key subcommittee, i value the work that you do, each of you do and fdd does on a range of policy issues, whether it is the security of our troops in afghanistan, but also the work you do to strengthen our policy as it relates to the regime and i ran. -- in iran. your team has brought to the forefront carefully thought out and persuasive research and policy positions that have been an outstanding resource for those of us in congress. i'm especially grateful for that help. i know the theme of this year's form is, foreign dictators, should the west choose sides? quite topical, given the events that have played out recently, wh
of state, they don't get into domestic politics. but when there's an extra nation on foreign policy to the american people, they do go on news shows. i used to go on news shows. susan rice has been on other news shows besides those five. they are the chief foreign policy spokesman for theed a handwriting. to suggest not to go on news shows because that's political is just not part of precedent and it's wrong. i think senator collins is -- i know her. i think she's trying to do the best job she can. but to say not to go on those news shows, that doesn't really jive. >> let me ask you one other thing, governor, about senator collins. she wants susan rice to explain her role in the bombings in africa, tanzania and kenya in 1998. you were the ambassador in 1998. did susan rice have any oversight or any authority at all that dealt with those embassies in kenya and tanzania that she would have to explain? >> no. she is not a homeland security officer. at the time, she was assistant secretary of africa on policy. she was making policy towards sudan, towards kenya, towards south africa. an
, vice president of foreign policy at brookings, coconvenienter of the forum on u.s./israel relations convening this week. thanks very much. what is the significance of what happened at the u.n.? a step forward, a step back or status quo? >> i guess a step sideways, out of the normal channel for resolving the conflict peacefully, that is through negotiati negotiations, sideways to the united nations. it doesn't move the palestinians forward. it's a significant but symbolic act. and if it produces a kind of punitive, vicious circle in which the israelis now announce more settlement activity, the particularly strategic activity it seems to be, and then the palestinians decide to go to the international criminal court who would charge israel with some crimes and then we'll get into a downward spiral, the congress cuts the funds to the palestinian authority, we could be in very negative territory quite quickly and bear in mind that there's an election coming up in israel in which an outbidding process is likely to occur. already you have lieberman calling for the toppling of abu mazen and
basis on which to determine british policy on this though? when the foreign secretary understands statehood is not a gift to be given, but a right to be acknowledged. i won the foreign secretary of the united kingdom abstains tomorrow, it will not be a measure of our growing influence. it would be a confirmation of our growing irrelevance to meaningful engagement in the search for peace across europe to meaningful engagement in the search for peace across europe to meaningful engagement in the search for peace across europe i believe will be the search for peace across europe i believe will be an overwhelming majority of 102 members of the general assembly voting for enhanced observer status for palestinians. that can and must send a signal to the palestinians that diplomatic effort in the path of politics or not the path of pockets of violence to his two state solution. let's be honest, in recent days, hamas in the midst of the conflict with israel welcome the secretary general, prime minister v-chip comforter set turkey, iraq, jordan come the pulse to any authority, saudi arabia
-- there was like -- there is a lack of talk i guess as far as obama's -- foreign policies also. so i just want to -- i want to see what you say about that, too. >> stephanie: i'm sorry. about his foreign policy? >> yeah. about his foreign policies. there's no real path that i see by that. where they -- where they're going with that, i guess. okay. that's a little doughy. he was spitballing a term paper. somehow the fiscal cliff got in the foreign policy. here is monday morning. it is all right. >> yeah, we just flush the lines with that one. >> stephanie: sure. a little telephone call and blow. >> yeah. >> is there something happening we should have a policy for that. >> said he was a college student so my guess is that if he's up this early he's probably still up from last night. >> stephanie: he's been up all night. things are a little doughy in there. that's okay. it is like jim -- >> give him 30 minutes. >> stephanie: last-minute ideas. curious your thoughts on -- >> stuff that happened -- [ ♪ "jeopardy
will understand that we cannot discern in our foreign policy our prior opinions. there are a number of issues on which we do not agree, on a conclusion that would be reached. >> mr. speaker, given the distinct history of our country and the legacy left behind in the region, does the foreign secretary agree that we have a unique ability to show leadership and courage for the palestinians and israelis who want peace. and surely, this can be one way to signal that leadership. i ask them to think again. >> we have a unique responsibility and we do not have the same power as in the 1940s, although we do have it in a new and different form. we have a great responsibility as a member of the u.n. u.n. security council. but the problem is giving hope to palestinians and israelis, that is a very important point that she made. it is important that we do that and give hope to people on both sides of that divide. and that is what i am seeking to do today. >> recognizing this position to an extent, but i'm sorry to say i think there are a lot of fundamentals -- [inaudible] given that countries around the w
's a problem with the photo op foreign policy with few real accomplishments and it's becoming more apparent to people around the world. >> gregg: we also supply aid to the palestinians, humanitarian aid. should that be reconsidered most recent actions against israel? >> with any aid you have to ask what it is doing, what goal is it advancing? we keep harping on both parties but seemingly hard the other israelis that we need to come to some sort of negotiation, get to the table have an agreement, petition agreement. i think we need to step back and realize the political factors in place for an agreement. if you have gaza run by hamas, starting wars with israel whenever you turn your back it's not going to lead to an agreement. we should be focusing on money and state on changing those political factors rather than writing these checks left and right. >> gregg: how do we can changes those political factors and what is the possibility in the near or distant future there could be a reconciliation and on the other hand gaza the palestinians there controlled by what is essentially a terrorist gro
to play what was essentially a political role. lou: israel, gaza, egypt, and ron, american foreign policy. will we ever get the facts on what happened in benghazi? we are joined next. ♪ lou: the white house today said president obama is not particularly concerned whether susan rice misled americans on the attack. press secretary fired back when asked whether the president recognizes the way information about benghazi has been handled and whether that raises serious questions. >> not particularly concerned about whether the ambassador or i went out and talk about the fact we believe extremists might have been irresponsible and whether we named them as terrorists or not does not -- no, it does not have any bearing on what happened and who is reeponsible as that investigation was continuing in benghazi. lou: you have to give this white house credit, i must say. i won't go into but we have to give them credit for, but ambassador susan rice failing to ease criticism again following meetings with senator susan collins and bob corker. joining us now, pulitzer prize-winning journalist, fox is c
and advisors are headed for the exits. who are the replacement and what impact on the foreign policy. doug has more for us in washington. >> foremost is who will replace hillary clinton as secretary of state? the white house signaled that un ambassador susan rice will be the choice . this week, the president voiced ut most confidence in her. >> susan rice is extraordinary . couldn't be prouder of a job done. >> also this week another republican senator expressed major doubts about rice not only about the bengazi terrorist attack but because of the africa section during the terrorist attack in the embassy in kenya when they pled for better security. susan collins teled the message to the administration about the secretary of state opening. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and easily confirmed by the colleagues. >> there are other key cabinet picks. secretary of the defense will have to contend with a destabilized middle east and rising threats from asia when big defense cuts are anticipated. former republican chuck ha gel of nebraska and ashton carter and michelle florino
's exactly what ari was saying which is the president is asking who is most in sync with my foreign policy? ambassador rice is someone who helped form late the obama foreign policy. i think senator kerry would too. democrats are now in a position where we have an embarrassment of riches. i really hope they don't start worrying about this or that political matter. in democrats can't win elections in massachusetts, there's something fundamentally wrong with what we're doing. >> he did win the last time, scott brown. not this time but the time before he won in massachusetts. we got to leave it there. paul, ari, guys thank you. the search is now on the for the country's latest multimillionaire. in the next hour we'll have the latest on where the winning tickets in the power ballot ri were sold. and coming up next, accusations a u.s. ally is now helping iran cheat on international economic sanctions by helping sell its oil for gold. [ male announcer ] when this hotel added aflac to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yel
'll read an excerpt from foreign policy. with the exception of syria she's won every major battle she's fought at u.n., imposes sanctions on north korea, sending a peacekeeping force, and warding off a full-scale war of sudan and south sudan. you're talking about qualifications for secretary of state, that qualifies her more than reading talking points. >> and at the beginning of this she was one of the few administration officials along with hillary clinton who pushed reluctant people inside the white house, including tom donnell lynn to interview in libya, a position senator republicans took at the time. >> human rights is a key issue and done a lot at u.n. with regard to women, disabled people. and i worked with her in the clinton administration. she was, you know, very tenacious. very intelligent woman. very strong willed. i guess one of the things, as a woman i don't like, some of the criticism of her, if this was a man, it -- these would be positive attributes. >> exactly. >> as a woman, well you know she's feisty. >> or they -- when mccain said she's not very brought, this is s
, the administration chose that particular foreign policy leader to go on sunday shows as opposed to other folks in the administration. my hunch is -- this is really just my guess. it isn't something i've coordinated. >> no talking points with the intelligence? >> no talking points. my view of it is that this was obviously a terrible incident where americans were killed. and there was clear sort of lack of full coordination and communication between elements of the executive branch. and they made a choice to have her be the sort of face forward for the administration on responding to questions about what had happened and why and when and where. i would be joining calls for an investigation and a joint committee and so forth if the administration were stonewalling and saying we won't be accountable for this. we won't tell you what happened. we won't get into the background. that's not been my experience. the senate foreign relations committee on which i serve unanimously sent a letter to the administration asking that we be briefe
these policy issues. in your role now, what do you think is the most critical issue in foreign policy at this point? >> well, there are a series of them. i do think that one has to deal with the issue of continuing terrorism in certain places and as we've already raised, the nuclear proliferation issue. i also -- my personal belief is that the gap between the rich and the poor is something that is a national security issue and needs to be looked at. and what i'm doing here in turkey is being present atten infrastructure conference which does talk about the importance of providing infrastructure in developing countries because it's really a way to pursue giving the people what they need. i believe democracy has to deliver and infrastructure is one of the deliverables that really proves that we can help each over and eliminates what is a basic injustice as this gap between the rich and the poor. >> internal difficulties to overcome, as well. madeleine albright former u.s. secretary of state. thank you again for your time this morning. >>> now if you're just joining us, a reminder these
what we're about to get to on foreign policy issues which will serve as a backdrop for the remainder of the term. you've got to get this done to get over that hump. you've got to think the president's focused on it which is why i remain optimistic that it may get done december 20th. >> on the sunday talk shows that you're talking about, let's just strip it down. a man in negotiations does not say to another man, you're going to cave. do you say that to another man in negotiations? and you think you're going to get him to cave? >> no, sloulgabsolutely not. >> oh, please, this is all about men. come on. first of all, a woman would never think saying that because they would lactually be much moe reasonable, and something would actually get done. but if you're going to negotiate as men, you're going to have to find a way to strategically make the other side feel whole while not destroying your own ego at the same time. i didn't understand when i watched the treasury secretary saying oh, yeah, they'll cave. that doesn't work between them. it doesn't. >> mika, listening to you speak -- >>
article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor jekyll, which is the nicer of the two is the economic issue. the dr. height is the strategic asia, is the security agent. if you look at the economic asia there's heavy amounts of interdependence, everybody is investigating each other. $19 billion in regional trade which includes india. if you look at the security asia, national entity, orders dispute, historical grievances just are driving things apart and you're seeing real impact on these. in the has its own problems in the region across china region across china. region across chandigarh on the border dispute. if you look at this is something that you want to be deeply engaged in or do you look at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by t
things. they don't believe in the same way to prosperity. they don't believe in the same way in foreign policy. they can agree that they love america. we do know, in fact, that there has been some democratic interest in one governor romney's ideas, which was to put a cap on deductions. just say, okay, you can only take, you know, this much of your income, that kind of thing. can i see that there might be a discussion about that, but the specifics are not going to be dealt with between mitt romney and president obama. that ship sailed. this has to do with the president and basically the republicans on the house side, so i see this more as a photo op. i guess we're fwog get a still picture and a read-out about their nice, cordal meeting. i'm not saying nothing could happen. i just think it's hard to figure what it would be. there's ain't lot of love between them here. they have to make nice. how do they begin, do you think, to work in the same direction, to kind of put that aside? how much of this relationship really needs repairing? >> i don't know that either one of them feel it needs r
of its name will have a tough time getting to third. >> emily cadei is a foreign-policy writer for cq, congressional quarterly. you can read her work at rollcall.com and follow her on twitter@emily cadei. thanks. >> guest: absolutely. >> for the first time, bradley melling's attorney spoke out publicly on his client. manning is accused of leaking classified documents on wikileaks. manny's pretrial hearing is underway. this is a half-hour. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. thank you. well, i really appreciate the turnout here and especially the turnout by the press. thank you for that. [applause] as many of you know, i have not participated any public events before today. i also avoid any interviews with the media. it was and still is my belief that bradley manning deserves an attorney that is focused on what is happening in the courtroom and only what is happening in the courtroom. that is why i have chosen not to do the interviews. but today however marks a milestone and is actually supposed to be really to the motions hearing that we were going through and it would mark the end of
life-saving assistance, whether they support children, strengthen food security or advance u.s. foreign policy. we also consider operational issues including efficient management and oversight. this case by case analysis ensures that there is careful consideration of the context surrounding a proposed activity. before the coup, usaid was the largest donor supporting leches in mali. programs trained poll workers and improved elections monitoring systems, strengthened political parties and provided voter education. when the electoral support activities resumed, providing the consent of congress, it will help support free an fair elections in mali and a peaceful political exit from the current situation. a key issue will be ensuring the inclusion and participation of the internally displaced personals and refugees in the political process. we plan to expand our elections assistance programming to include broader civic engagement activities, to support national reconciliation as part of the return to an inclusive democratic maliian society. the only usaid supported economic growth activitie
do anything other than a spectacular job. but i'm a political guy, not a foreign policy guy. i'm just unable to really render a very knowledgeable -- >> let me rephrase the question. politically speaking, who would the president be better off nominating? >> politically speaking? probably ambassador rice because she would represent sort of new and different administration. but i don't think people when they look at the secretary of state, i don't think that there's much of a political gain there. i say that, but i say it without a lot of conviction or a lot of authority. i think the one that you want is the one that does the best job because if they get in there and do something wrong, the politics of it are horrendous for you. i'm just not that -- that's not my area of expertise. >> mary, what's your thought? >> he cannot nominate susan rice and not because of the benghazi scandal but because of her previous tenure at state where she doesn't have a good record and her u.n. record is not good. we don't have time to go through the particulars, but i think senator kerry would not only be
received by the foreign relations committee. joining the convention will not require any change. i emphasize that again it doesn't require any change. in the existing united states law of policies regarding treatment of the disabled. and the statements before the foreign relations committee, the united states would assume in joining the convention. in order to } the importance of this point, the foreign relations committee specifically address it -- in the instrument of ratification, the current united states law for bills the obligations of the convention of the united states of america. on a related point, we also underscored that the convention will not be self-executing in the united states law. this means that the provisions are not directly enforceable in united states courts. and we do not confer private rights of action enforceable in the united states. these provisions of advice and consent establish important parameters. they give effect to the intent of the senate and they join in the convention that will not require any changes the united states laws and policies, with
of cybersecurity executive orders here at home may be cited back to us by some foreign nations, with them accusing us of telling them to do as we say, but not as we do. historical hands off regulatory policy has allowed the internet to become the greatest vehicle for global, social, and economic liberty since the printing press. despite the current economic climate, it continues to grow at an astonishing pace. the f.c.c. commissioner and are in dubai this week as u.s. delegates, our committee has also sent representatives from both parties to keep an eye on the proceedings. they are the 193 member countries of the united nations are gathered to consider whether to apply to the internet a regulatory regime that the internet telecommunications union created in the 1980's for old-fashioned telephone service. as well as whether to swallow the internet's nongovernmental organizational structure whole and make it part of the united nations. neither of these are acceptable outcomes and must be strongly opposed by our delegation. among those supportive of such regulation is russian president putin who spo
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)